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Robin Redbreast

Legend has it that the robin received its red breast from trying to remove the bloody thorns from Christ's head at the Crucifixion, with a small drop of His blood falling on the bird and injuring itself in the process: 

‘A Robin Redbreast in a Cage
Puts all Heaven in a Rage.’

Extract taken from ‘Auguries of Innocence’ : William Blake

It is also believed traditionally that the robin received its red feathers as it was taking water into Hell for the burning sinners.

Has nautical associations. Said to be extremely unlucky to kill this bird (see Thomas Bewick's 'History of British Birds’, 1798). The hand that does so will continue to shake thereafter. Traditionally the Irish (UK) believe that a large lump will appear on the right hand if you kill one, and in Yorkshire (UK)  if the person owns cows then the milk will become blood coloured. It is a reputed fact that whatever you do to a robin you will suffer the same tragedy. Breaking the eggs will result in something valuable of your own being broken. Flying in through an open window or tapping on the window is a sign of death being present. To see a robin sheltering in the branches of a tree indicates that rain is on the way, whilst to see one chirping on an open branch indicates that fine weather is imminent. Some believe that the robin will not be chased by a cat. You should make a wish when seeing the first robin of the season, making sure that you are quick as if the bird flies away then no good luck will be present for the next twelve months. (See Mystical WWW Mystical Birds Introduction).