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Cockerel

The cockerel is reputed to be the bird that signaled the birth of Christ to the world, therefore it is a bird thought to be an enemy of ghosts and negative energies and spirits. Some believe that on the ‘Day of Judgment’, all cockerels, even those made of wood or iron will crow to wake the dead as well as the living. An ancient belief also indicates that the cockerel crows to welcome the dawn so that all ghosts and any evil and negative forces know it is time to return to the underworld. A white cockerel is thought universally to be lucky whilst the black cockerel attracts negative energies, and in some parts of Europe is thought to be in league with the Devil. Up until the 19th-century a cockerel was buried in the foundations of a church to ward off the Devil. In Scotland (UK) cockerels were once buried at the junction of three streams to cure disease but also to ensure that evil forces and negative energies were cleansed. In Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' the cockerel is referred to as crowing from Christmas Eve through to Christmas morning to ensure that negative forces are kept away. If a cockerel crows at dusk it signals that bad weather will come the next day, but if it crows at night then there is likely to be death in the family. To hear a cockerel crowing as you set off to work is heralded as an omen of good luck for the day. 

This bird is also associated by some with curative qualities when rubbed on the body of the sufferer (hence why it is associated also with certain rituals enacted for cleansing of the soul). The bird should be cast out to sea or removed from the area at the very least so that the illness is taken with it. An almost universal belief tells that for any medicine to be affective it should be taken as the cockerel crows.